J. Cole Says ‘1985’ Is Not Directed at Lil Pump

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(FreshAsFrankie) J. Cole is one clever rapper. The Fayetteville representer dropped a masterpiece of an album last week, and his resurgence into the hip-hop game was well received by most. On KOD, Cole takes aim at the drug-fueled hip-hop culture that has been taking over the game in the last few years. Rappers went from wanting to be drug dealers in the 90’s and early 00’s, to essentially rapping about being addicts in the last decade. The 360 turn in music prompted Cole to address the situation, which caused several rappers to cry out in defense.

On the albums final track, “1985 (Into to ‘The Fall Off’)” Cole unloads his opinions on several of the druggie rappers, and hip-hop heads speculated that the song took shots at Lil Pump. Pump had previously taken jabs at J Cole on a track called “Fuck J Cole,” and he himself felt like “1985” was aimed at him. Since then, he’s acted like a 17-year-old would, and called out Cole for taking shots at a teenager after practically promoting the supposed diss in the first place. Sitting down with Vulture, Cole explains that his outro is not aimed at any one rapper.

It’s really a ‘shoe fits’ situation—several people can wear that shoe,” Cole explained referring to “1985.” “Why you yelling at your show? You must feel attacked in some kind of way, must feel offended, and if you feel offended, then that means something rings true, something struck a chord. That’s cool with me. That’s all I ever want to do.”

Cole also added, “If you exclude the top three rappers in the game, the most popping rappers all are exaggerated versions of black stereotypes.”

Source: complex.com

DeRon Beasley is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of FreshAsFrankie.com. After starting out as a musician-producer he went on to study the music business and work in Urban Promotions, followed by artist management. Mr. Beasley entrepreneurial spirit has led him to launch numerous businesses in music and fashion marketing. He’s a huge fan of the ’80s and ’90s Hip Hop and R&B, and he’s a firm believer that Hip Hop Music will never die.

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